Thomas Edison was one of the greatest inventors who ever lived.  He patented the incandescent light bulb, the carbon microphone, the phonograph, the motion picture projector, and a thousand other inventions.  But few people know that Edison also was working on a machine that would be able to communicate with the dead.  In an article in a 1921 issue of The Scientific American, Edison wrote:  “If our personality survives, then it is strictly logical or scientific to assume that it retains memory, intellect, other faculties and knowledge that we acquire on this Earth.  Therefore, if personality exists after what we call death, it is reasonable to conclude that those who leave the Earth would like to communicate with those they have left here.  I am inclined to believe that our personality hereafter will be able to affect matter.  If this reasoning be correct, then, if we can evolve an instrument so delicate as to be affected by our personality as it survives in the next life, such an instrument, when made available, ought to record something.”  Although it was believed that Edison worked on a prototype for this invention until his own death in 1931, models or plans for this telephone to the afterlife were never found.

 

About the author

I am the author of 16 books including my latest: The Myth of the ADHD Child: 101 Ways to Improve Your Child's Behavior and Attention Span Without Drugs, Labels, or Coercion (Tarcher-Perigee). http://amzn.to/2ewwfbp.
1 Response
  1. After exploring a handful of the articles on your website, I truly appreciate your technique of writing a blog. I saved as a favorite it to my bookmark website list and will be checking back in the near future. Please check out my website too and let me know your opinion.

Leave a Reply

Article Archives