By

Thomas Armstrong
What is tacit knowing?  As I pointed out in my last blog post, it’s ”knowing more than we can tell.” One of the best examples comes from oral language.  We all learned to speak based on tacit learning experiences. How is it that we can effortlessly put one word right after the other without breaking...
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There’s all this talk of ‘’best practices’’ in education but nobody talks about worst practices.  Well, here’s something that I think qualifies as a ‘’worst practice’’ – it involves educators’ propensity to teach mostly explicit knowledge as opposed to tacit knowledge.  Scientist and philosopher Michael Polanyi bases his understanding of ‘’tacit knowing’’ on the principle...
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I’m getting fed up with the word ”data” that I keep hearing and reading about in the educational media.  To help articulate exactly why the word conjures up such a disagreeable sensation in my gut, I’ve listed seven reasons why the word should be stricken from every educator’s vocabulary. ”Data” is a word from information...
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A lot of recent research supports the systematic teaching of phonics in beginning reading programs.  The problem is that phonics lessons can get awfully dull, with teachers pointing to the letter and having kids say the sound, or students poring over phonics worksheets that ask them to match the right letter to the word, add...
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Ken Wilber is known as one of the founders of ”integral psychology” which refers to an attempt to formulate a theory of the psyche that incorporates ideas from both psychology and spirituality.  Perhaps Wilber’s most well-known model of human development, or ”spectrum of consciousness” is rather simple, based as it is on three different levels: ...
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