By

Thomas Armstrong
Back in the early 1970's, I remember reading a book by George Leonard (who just passed away last month) called Education and Ecstasy.  The book was in part a futuristic look at education.  In one section, children faced a giant screen and all they had to do was touch it and they could learn practically anything...
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An article appeared this last week in the New York Times, that attempted to answer the question:  why is depression still in the gene pool if it leads to despair and even suicide?  I was very interested in the piece because I've suffered from depression since adolescence, and believe me, it's been no picnic.  The author...
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Yesterday we looked at the impact that Universal Design for Learning tools can have for a neurodiversity classroom.  Today, we examine the role that assistive technologies can have in promoting "niche construction" for neurodiverse brains.  As we noted in our earlier post on neurodiversity and niche construction, one critical ingredient in improving the lives of...
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What does neurodiversity look like in a classroom?  First, it provides an inclusive membership, where people of all labels and those without labels are able to learn together.  In order to bring this about, we need to abandon the "one size fits all" mentality that has guided education for too many years.  Instead of a cookie...
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In my forthcoming book Neurodiversity:  Discovering the Extraordinary Gifts of Autism, ADHD, Dyslexia and Other Brain Differences, I explore the idea of niche construction as a way of thinking about neurodiversity.  When I suggest that neurodiverse individuals, such as those with autism or ADHD, might have been labeled gifted in other times and in other...
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